Anthony Johnson may have announced his retirement from MMA after losing to Daniel Cormier on Saturday night at UFC 210, but that doesn’t mean he’s going quietly.

According to ESPN, Johnson’s manager Ali Abdelaziz confirmed that they would filing an official appeal over Cormier’s bizarre weigh in the day before the fight, where he appeared to miss weight before miraculously shedding 1.2 pounds in a matter of minutes (perhaps with the aid of some towel support). While the result of the fight won’t change, a fighter who misses weight is typically fined 20 percent of his fight purse, with the bulk of that amount going to their opponent (with the athletic commission keeping a portion).

“I understand New York is new to regulating mixed martial arts, but they’ve been doing boxing for a long time,” Abdelaziz said. “Everybody is trying to sweep this under the rug, but it’s not going to happen.”

Additionally, Johnson’s lawyer also commented on the matter, saying that the New York State Athletic Commission shouldn’t get a pass just because they are new too MMA (the sport was only legalized in the state last year after almost a decade of lobbying).

From Johnson’s lawyer, Craig Zimmerman:

“Anthony’s opponent came in overweight. I don’t think anyone disputes that. He weighs in, he’s 206.2 roughly, and somehow a minute or two later, he goes backstage, he comes back out, they try it again, he leans on a towel and miraculously he makes weight. I’m a licensed promoter and attorney. I’m licensed in California. The weigh-in is one of the most sacred things in combative sports. Do both fighters meet the weight requirement? Particularly with a title fight, there’s not even a pound allowance. And if you miss weight, there’s a fine.

 

“I think we need three things. One, we need acknowledgment that the weigh-in was handled incorrectly. Two, we need DC to be fined the 20 percent he should’ve been fined for coming in overweight. And three, we need New York to clean up the weigh-in procedures so this doesn’t happen again.”(Via)

Unfortunately for Johnson, fighter appeals are rarely successful. Holly Holm appealed to the New York Commission last year after she lost a fight in which she was hit hard numerous times after the rounds ended, but she lost that appeal.